Short Courses

RFG is offering a large variety of pre and post-conference short courses. All short courses will be held at the Convention Centre. To register for the conference and short courses, click here. If you want to register for a short course only (not for the conference), the short course fee will be $100 more than what is listed below.

The organization reserves the right to cancel a short course if this one has not reach the minimum of participants. In that case, you will be notified by email of the cancellation around mid-May.

Pre-conference 2 Days Short Courses

Saturday and Sunday, June 16 and 17, 2018

Description:

The 1815 William Smith geological map of England and Wales, seen as the first formal geological map, was 3D to the extent that it was accompanied by cross-sections. Since then, geological mapping has become fundamental to all geoscience and its application to energy, minerals, water, engineering, and hazards. In the late 1990s, geological survey agencies began to more comprehensively map the thickness and properties of multiple strata, and selected deformed structures, in a 3D GIS environment. Developments were driven by progress in digital methods, large databases, and geophysical methods, concurrent with escalating societal needs. 3D models are quickly becoming the standard for assessing resource potential and geological risk for both industry and government agencies, and are frequently used to assist with stakeholder engagement and communication. A series of workshops designed to facilitate sharing of best practices in this field was initiated by Berg and Thorleifson in 2001, later joined by Russell and MacCormack. This biennial series has become an international forum regularly attended by 50 to 100 survey practitioners and allied persons that has been held in Illinois, Denver, Ontario, Salt Lake, Portland, Minneapolis, and Baltimore. For the proposed 2018 workshop at RFG in Vancouver, multiple speakers from North America, Europe, and China are already confirmed.

Objectives:

The objective is to facilitate sharing of best practices in regional 3D geological mapping and resultant modelling, with an emphasis on sediments and sedimentary basins. Topics will include program design, data compilation, model construction, uncertainty, innovation in 3D visualization, communication of model results to stakeholders, accessibility and dissemination of model products, information management, and the use of 3D products to support science-based decision making.

Target Audience:

Geological survey agency managers and geologists, academic and industry partners and users, as well as less experienced geologists and information managers who seek to enter the field

Short Course Organizer:

Minnesota Geological Survey

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

The facilitators are the organizers of a biennial series of 3D geological mapping workshops that began in 2001, and that has been the model for workshops now operating elsewhere in the world: Richard Berg PhD, Illinois State Geological Survey; Kelsey MacCormack PhD, Alberta Geological Survey; Hazen Russell PhD, Geological Survey of Canada; Harvey Thorleifson PhD, Minnesota Geological Survey.

Price:

$240 include course notes, coffee breaks and 2 luncheons

Description:

Environmental and socio-economic demands in the exploitation of future mineral resources require a comprehensive collection and evaluation of mineralogical, geochemical, lithological, physical and metallurgical attributes about ore bodies along with their inherent variability. Geometallurgy is the scientific discipline that integrates all of the mineralogical, geological, mining and processing data into an accurate ore body model that forms the basis for optimization of production and environmental management during the entire life of the project. This course will address: (1) The principles of geometallurgy and critical evaluation of sampling, mineralogical and geochemical methods; and (2) Selected case studies of applications of geometallurgy involving: innovative evaluation of mineral deposits, mineral exploration, resource estimation, applications and implementation of quantitative mineralogical and geochemical data, mining and ore processing, and energy use, treatment of tailings and waste rock and remediation, or implementation of geometallurgical models in mining and plant operations. The Geometallurgy short course will lasts for 2 days given its breadth.

Objectives:

This course will address the principles of GeoMetallurgy including: critical evaluation of sampling, mineralogical and geochemical methods, innovative evaluation of mineral deposits, mineral exploration, resource estimation, applications and implementation of quantitative mineralogical and geochemical data, mining and ore processing, and energy use, treatment of tailings and waste rock and remediation, and implementation of GeoMetallurgical models in mining and plant operations.

Target Audience:

Geoscientists, Mineral Processors

Short Course Organizer:

SGS

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Tassos Grammatikopoulos from SGS; Julie Hunt from Mineral Deposit Research, Unit UBC; Pim Van Geffen from Vancouver Geochemistry; Brian Hart from University of Western Ontario; Norman Lotter from Flowsheets Metallurgical Consulting; David Hatton from SGS; Julian Ortiz from Queen's University and Roussos Dimitrakopoulos from McGill University.

Price:

$600 for professional / $200 for student

include course notes, coffee breaks and 2 luncheons

Description:

Interactive and action-packed training workshop that leaves participants with the ability to ensure a higher level of success in their own projects, especially when those risks pertain to energy, minerals, water and the Earth. An array of project risk management techniques will be explored and tested, resulting in an improved understanding of how to identify and manage both technical and non-technical project risks, leading to improved outcomes and greater project success.

Project decisions are dominated by the "iron triangle"™ of time, cost and quality, with sustainability criteria rarely being taking into consideration (Silvius, Kampinga, Paniagua & Mooi, 2017). This narrow focus leads to over 60% of major projects running over budget and/or over time, because the uncertain opportunities or threats to the projects (risks) are not identified, understood, or managed appropriately. These risks are often non-technical or sustainability- related in nature, which include, but are not limited to, energy, minerals, water and the Earth. This short course is designed to help participants ensure: their projects are run successfully by addressing all the major risks faced by their project; there is an effective handover of risk management from the project to operational phase; together with how to regularly communicate to the wider stakeholder group the status of your risks; and what needs to be done to proactively mitigate them. This course has been designed by four project risk experts, all of whom have extensive experience in delivering projects within industries such as mining, oil & gas, environmental services, academia, government and security. All experts will contribute to the course, with at least two experts in the room at any given time. The course will comprise of a wide range of interactive training techniques, inclusive of relevant case studies and practical examples, pertaining to the themes of RFG 2018.

Objectives:

  • Identify and address major project risks pertaining to their projects;
  • Select and use appropriate tools and techniques to safeguard project success;
  • Ensure risks are managed across their lifecycle, both within and beyond the project phase; and
  • Replicate the interactive nature of learnt exercises in their own organizations.

This will be achieved through:

  • Conducting a full risk assessment on a case study project, investigating a variety of project risk management tools in the process.
  • Presenting a risk analysis to a mock steering committee, participating in a steering committee, and exploring how to induce decision making through the risk management process.
  • Analyzing and updating a case study portfolio, creating a feedback presentation.
  • Defining application of their lessons in their own context/work.

Target Audience:

Individuals who need to ensure successful project delivery, as well as those who have delivered many successful projects themselves. You could be working in industry, academia, charities or government with an interest in the fields of geoscience or earth science, mineralogy, metallurgy or mining. Participants may therefore include: project managers; project management office; coordinators; program or portfolio managers; project risk managers; risk managers; and sustainability experts.

Short Course Organizer:

Satarla

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Sarah Gordon (BSc (Hons), PhD) based in London, UK

Managing Director, Satarla

Ollie de Boer, (BSc (Hons), MSc, PRINCE2, CIRM), based in Vancouver, Canada

Associate, Satarla

John F. Gravel, (BSc, OLDP) based in Vancouver, Canada

Managing Director, Bedrock-Service

Craig Rice, (P.Eng, MEng) based in Vancouver, Canada

Director & Principal Consultant, Redteam Projects

Price:

$750 include course notes, coffee breaks and 2 luncheons

Description:

Mineral deposit evaluation involves various studies and projects aimed at estimation of mineral resources, characterizing the ore body and assessing the risks and opportunities in the process of development of the project. The processes followed for the development of the mineral deposits in the world are different in different due to many conditions. However there are also similarities at a higher level. For an example, the sequence of studies and various projects in a study are common in various parts of the world.

This short course will focus on the best practices followed in i) Project development and sequence of studies, ii) best practices in resource estimation and classification, ii) International reporting standards and iv) assessment of risks due to geological controls of mineralization and v) tips for writing a good technical report.

Objectives:

The participants of this course will be able to participate in discussions and learn the best practices followed in the world in the evaluation of a mineral deposit. Through a combination of multiple group discussions and exercises the course provides an unique learning experience for the participants.

The short course is designed to provide some key tips for enhancing quality of the study process and enhancing confidence on mineral resource estimates and producing a technical report rich in its contents.

The program will feature live demonstration of state of the art geostatistical software - ISATIS (from Geovariances, France) and allow participants to use software free of cost for a limited time after the course.

See brochure

Target Audience:

Mining industry professionals, researchers and academicians.

Short Course Organizer:

GeoGlobal, LLC

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dr. Abani R. Samal is well recognized for his expertise in mineral deposit evaluation, resource estimation and advanced geostatistical analyses. He has extensive training (MS and PhD) in economic geology and geostatistics. In last 20 years in industry, he has gained experience in various commodities including gold, iron ore, complex sulphide deposits such as Cu-Mo-Au-Ag, Pb-Zn-Ag etc. and industrial minerals around the world. His industry experience includes strategic planning for mineral exploration, resource estimation, applied geostatistics, mine to mill reconciliation. The exploration and mining projects where Dr Samal has worked on include Brisas gold project (Venezuela), Black-Fox (Canada), Resolution copper (USA), Kisanfu copper deposit (DRC), Bingham Canyon Mine (USA), Oyu Tolgoi (Mongolia), Boron (USA), Southern System iron ore deposits (Brazil), Las Truchas iron ore deposits (Mexico), Diavik diamond deposit (Canada), beach sand (rutile) deposits (India, Africa) and Onća-Puma lateritic nickel deposits in Brazil. Dr. Samal is a registered member of SME (RM-SME), a certified professional geologist (CPG) and a Fellow of the Society for Economic Geologists (SEG), Fellow of the Geological Society of India, Life member of IAMG, MEAI, MGMI and SGAT. Dr Samal is a qualified person as per international resource reserve reporting standards such as JORC and NI-43-101. He is providing professional development programs to the mineral industry worldwide in the areas of Mineral resource estimation, Geostatistics, Mining project development and studies, Resource reporting using international reporting standards. Dr. Samal's contributions to the industry are well recognized through his publications and presentations at various national and international conferences. He enjoys speaking at professional events and major academic / research institutions. Most recently, he spoke at the international conference of CRIRSCO (India, November 2016), The CTMF Conference (NY, April, 2017).

Price:

$750 include course notes, coffee breaks and 2 luncheons

Description:

Isotope geochemistry is an integral part of the Earth sciences, particularly in revealing the fourth dimension of our science (time), reveling the processes involved in natural systems, and tracing the flux of elements through geosphere-hydrosphere-biosphere systems. As such, isotope geochemistry is built on a platform of pure and theoretical science, but is primarily an applied science that adds value to mineral exploration, environmental stewardship, whole earth ecology, timing and causes of evolution, paleoclimates and even food authentication. As an applied science, isotope geochemistry has expanded from traditional light stable isotopes and long-lived decay systems studied by a few experts into studies involving most elements in the periodic table, additional geochronometers and enhanced integration with other aspects of Earth science by a broad range of users. This course addresses the recent applications of isotope geochemistry in the Earth sciences and how integration with other disciplines represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the processes that operate in natural systems. Those involved in the course include the top isotope geochemists in Canada.

Topics covered in this short-course include:

  1. Processes that result in isotopic variability in natural systems
  2. Application of transition metal isotopes in ore systems research
  3. Application of isotopes to exploration for VMS deposits
  4. Applied U-Pb geochronology of ore minerals by SIMS
  5. Application of Pb isotopes in exploration and environmental science
  6. Application of Fe isotopes to the evolution of the geosphere
  7. Noble gas isotopes applied to geothermal resources
  8. Application of isotopes to understanding clay minerals
  9. Isotopes in sequestration strategies for environmental waste
  10. Geochemistry of heavy metal isotopes: tracers of anthropogenic sources and environmental footprint
  11. New frontiers: clumped isotopes and MIF applications in geoscience research

Target Audience:

Earth scientists from exploration, environment; students in particular

Short Course Organizer:

Mineralogical Association of Canada

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Kurt Kyser (Queen's University), Fred Longstaffe (Western), Ian Clark (Ottawa), Bruce Taylor (GSC), Simon Jackson (GSC), Galen Halverson (McGill), Daniele Pinti (UQAM), Mostafa Fayek (UManitoba), Bruce Eglington (USask), Dominique Weiss (UBC), Prosenjit Ghosh (India, Queen’s University)

Price:

$550 for professional / $200 for student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and 1 lunch on Saturday

Pre-conference One-Day Short Courses

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Description:

The short course is aimed at senior students and geological professionals alike and aims to create awareness for the potential of geology and geochemistry in providing forensic intelligence in criminal cases, law enforcement resource management, food authentication, endangered animals and associated topics. The morning sessions will provide an introduction to the essential topics and the afternoon session will provide a hands-on experience using a mock crime scenario that will be solved by the participants using the open source R statistical software and dedicated scripts provided by the presenters.

Program details

  1. Introduction to workshop & software installation (JH, PdC & & JMcK)
    • Introduction of learning outcomes
    • Introduction of lecturers and participants
    • Installation of R software & packages.
  2. Principles of forensic science (JH)
    • Forensic work flow (crime scene, chain of custody,...)
    • Hypothesis generation
    • Evidential value assessment
  3. The use of geology in forensic science (JH)
    • History of dirt and dust in forensics
    • Geophysics: Detection of forensic anomalies
    • Geochemistry: Microscopy, Mineralogy, Elementary and Isotopic composition
  4. Geochemical mapping (PdC & JMcK)
    • Sampling design
    • Analytical methods
    • Compositional data
    • Spatial statistics
    • Presentation of geochemical data
  5. Casework examples (JH)
    • Food authentication
    • Provenancing of cannabis
    • Provenancing of human remains
  6. Hands-on geochemical mapping with R (JH, PdC & & JMcK)
    • Spatial data structures
    • Coordinate systems
    • Spatial statistics in R
    • Forensic reporting
  7. Mock case competition (JH, PdC & & JMcK)
    • Teams work through mock case scenario
  8. Case presentation and discussion (JH, PdC & & JMcK)
    • 5 minute team presentation
    • Discussion & evaluation of short course

Target Audience:

Senior students and geological professionals.

Short Course Organizer:

National Centre Forensic Studies, University of Canberra, Australia.

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dr Jurian Hoogewerff (Short Course Coordinator). Associate Professor Forensic Geochemistry, National Centre Forensic Studies, University of Canberra. Australia.

Expert in forensic chemistry, isotope provenancing and geochemical mapping.

Dr Patrice de Caritat, Senior Scientist Geoscience Australia and Australian Federal Police, Canberra, Australia.

Expert in geochemical mapping, soil and ore mineralogy and presently seconded to the AFP to develop forensic soil capabilities.

Dr Jennifer McKinley, Reader Geostatistics, School of Natural and Built Environment, Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Expert in geochemical mapping, geostatistics, data analysis and forensic applications.

Price:

$250 Include course notes, coffee breaks (no lunch).

Description:

This course takes advantage of digital imaging techniques to capture geological features and generate photo-realistic, texture-rendered models that can be output as 3D PDFs and high-resolution orthoimages. The morning session will focus on methods and applications of capturing large- to small-scale geological features using drones and terrestrial photographic methods. The afternoon session will involve an interactive session where participants will capture objects with their camera (DSLR, point-and-shoot or mobile phone) and then produce their own 3D models and orthomosaic images in the classroom. This course will highlight the rapid and cost-effective nature of acquiring spatially referenced models as well as their application in geosciences, including exploration, teaching and academic studies.

Objectives:

To teach practical skills in the acquisition of digital imagery and its applications in geology.

Target Audience:

People interested in science communication, geological mapping and cost-effective exploration techniques. Students are strongly encouraged to participate.

Short Course Organizer:

TMVC and AusGeol.org

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dr. Evan Orovan is a Research Fellow in Ore Deposit Footprints for Transforming the Mining Value Chain (an ARC Industrial Transformation Research Hub) at the Centre for Ore Deposit and Exploration Science (CODES), University of Tasmania. He previously worked at the British Columbia Geological Survey and Xstrata Copper Canada before completing his PhD on porphyry deposits at CODES.

Dr. Stephanie Sykora is a global generative exploration and research geologist with First Quantum Minerals Ltd. She completed a PhD at CODES, University of Tasmania, under the supervision of David Cooke and David Selley. Previously she worked for Teck Resources Ltd. in British Columbia before completing her PhD. She has worked on multiple geology projects using 3D imagery, in both the data capture/photography side and structural analysis side. Stephanie is also an avid scientific communicator and authors the blog www.exploringtheearth.com.

Erin Lawlis is a PhD student at CODES, where she is studying volcanic and mineralizing processes at the Lihir epithermal gold deposit under the supervision of David Cooke and Angela Escolme. She has extensive knowledge and experience using photogrammetry and has worked as a photographer for the AusGeol project in Northern Territory, Australia. Prior to her studies at CODES, Erin was employed at Osisko Mining Corporation, the Yukon Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of Canada.

Price:

$530 for professionl / $380 for student

Include coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

Mineral chemistry methods have long been routinely and successfully employed in diamond exploration, and over the past decade have also been increasingly utilised in base and precious metal exploration. Some of these methods promise great potential to improve assessment of metallogenic fertility and vectoring to mineralisation, and will undoubtedly see much wider application in exploration programs in the years to come.

Objectives:

This one-day short course is intended to introduce exploration geologists and geochemist to the state of the art of key mineral chemistry methods used in the exploration for diamond, porphyry copper, epithermal gold and orogenic gold deposits. The short course will be presented by a high-calibre team from industry and academia, and will focus on exploration-relevant applications and case studies, while also providing an adequate understanding of the scientific and analytical fundamentals.

Target Audience:

Geoscientists, exploration managers, geochemists, geologists.

Short Course Organizer:

AAG

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dr. Christian Ihlenfeld is the Lead Geochemist with Anglo American for greenfield mineral exploration, well versed in the application of mineral chemistry studies in exploration. In addition to Christian, the course will include well known mineral chemistry proponents including John Dilles (porphyry Zircons), David Cooke (Green rock and lithocaps, epidote, chlorite), George Beaudoin (Magnetite Chemistry) and R. Preston (Diamond Exploration).

Price:

$350 for professional / $175 student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

An introduction to the activities of a mining company, geology, exploration, open pit and underground mining and mineral processing. Demonstration of the basic activities with many illustrations and videos, complemented by stories and anecdotes drawn from the speaker's experience.

Objectives:

The objectives of this course are to understand how minerals are formed, how we explore for them, how me mine them, how we process them and how we extract the metals from them. At the end of the day, the participant will know the critical technical factors impacting on the success of mining companies.

Target Audience:

This course is intended for people interested in a broad overview of how the mining business works from a technical perspective. This course is designed for sales representatives, lawyers, accountants, human resources, company directors, investors, stakeholders, and students dealing with the mining industry.

Short Course Organizer:

Geology & Mining Evaluation Consulting

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

George McIsaac, P.Eng., PhD, is a mining engineer and a mineral economist, with 35 years experience in industry, research and development, consulting, and teaching. He specializes in the economics of the mine, combining design, planning, costing, and cash flow estimation, to diagnose the problems and the risks they pose, and to prescribe the steps to minimize them.

Price:

$250 Include course notes, coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

The design and installation of geothermal systems involve various expertise related to both the building and the subsurface. Geo-engineers and scientists are needed to characterize the subsurface and plan the installation of the boreholes that host the ground heat exchangers. The tasks to perform include the drilling of an exploration borehole, measurement of the subsurface thermal properties, making recommendations for the choice of material to fill the boreholes and calculation of required ground heat exchanger length to fulfill the building energy needs. Basic knowledge to perform these tasks and understand the design of geothermal systems will be introduced to the participants during this course. Interactive exercises will help the participants to develop the skills necessary to conduct geothermal projects.

Objectives:

The objective of this one-day course is to introduce geo-engineers and scientists to the design of geothermal heating and cooling systems also known as ground-source heat pump systems. Subsurface aspects of geothermal systems will be emphasized.

Target Audience:

Geo-engineers and scientists

Short Course Organizer:

INRS Université de Recherche

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Professor Jasmin Raymond will give this short course. Interested in geothermal energy, he conducts research on low to medium temperature resources, including heat pump systems. The main objective of his projects, done in collaboration with geothermal designers, operators and manufacturers, is to improve the efficiency and profitability of systems by providing scientific and technological innovations. Mr Raymond is a hydrogeologist and he teaches geothermal energy basics at Institut national de la recherche scientifique in Quebec City. He obtained his Ph.D. at Laval University and a B.Sc. at McGill University. He currently holds a research chair from l’Institut nordique du Québec to investigate the geothermal potential of northern communities and mines in addition to be the coleader of an international research group on geothermal energy supported by UNESCO. Highly involved in the scientific community, he participates to a task group of the Canadian Standard Association on geothermal heat pumps and the geothermal advisory committee of Geoscience BC. He coauthored a report from the Geological Survey of Canada on the geothermal potential of the country and received the Canadian Geotechnical Society Colloquium Award in order to complete a cross-Canada lecture tour during 2016-2017.

Price:

$350 Include course notes (USB key), coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

Geochemistry remains one of the fundamental tools used in mineral exploration along with geology and geophysics, however, underlying fundamentals that govern the behavior of chemical elements in the environment is often poorly understood by geologists leading to inappropriate application. Modern analytical techniques often provide a wealth of trace element information for 50 plus elements at sub ppm level, however, few organisations maximise the value of this information in the context of target selection, prioritisation and geochemical-geological mapping.

Objectives:

This short course is intended to introduce the geologist / geochemist to simple fundamental concepts that govern the distribution and dispersion of chemical elements in mineral deposits and the natural environment and apply the principles to the design of surveys, analytical methodology/technology, target selection/prioritisation and lessons to be learnt from survey post-mortems.

Target Audience:

Geologists, exploration project managers, junior scientists, junior and aspiring geochemists

Short Course Organizer:

AAG

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dr. Peter Winterburn is an Exploration Geochemist with over 25 years of experience in industry prior to joining the Mineral Deposit Research Unit, Peter was previously employed by Anglo American plc as their Regional Geochemist in Africa and subsequently in South America. Peter also held the post of Chief Geochemist: Global Exploration with Vale based out of Toronto, Canada. In addition, Peter has worked in over 60 countries providing practical exploration geochemical solutions and training in a range of environments from tropical to arctic to arid deserts in both mountainous and subdued terrains. Peter is currently the NSERC/AcmeLabs/Bureau Veritas Minerals Research Chair in Exploration Geochemistry at MDRU, where he directs a program aimed at answering many of the questions and providing practical applications with respect to the discovery of minerals deposits through transported overburden.

Price:

$350 for professional / $175 for student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

Geoscientists Canada last year developed a one day short course specifically for students to improve basic awareness at the university level about resources reporting and the role of the QP. The course covers all resources reporting mining, energy and also speak to water resources and environmental reporting. It is designed to be of benefit to all students regardless of their subsequent career direction.

The course consists of 4 quarter-day modules each with an accompanying breakout group exercise involving discussion and plenary exchange.

The 4 modules cover:
  1. Reporting Issuer and Securities Background & Case Study 1
  2. Qualified Person & Case Study 2
  3. Mining and NI 43-101 Overview & Case Study 3
  4. Oil & Gas and NI 51-101 Overview & Case Study 4

For RFG, the current course will be significantly adapted so it is less Canada- centric, has strong international content and broad student and regular delegate appeal

Objectives:

Important features of the course are:

It is pitched for students at a career ahead awareness level. It is not a how-to course so is not suitable for P.Geo or others seeking to train as a QP per se. (There are many specific professional-level CPD products available elsewhere for this purpose). However the course would be of interest to a broad range of geoscientists at any career stage, seeking a solid introduction to the expanding topic of public reporting It uses both energy and mining reporting to introduce all types of public reporting by professionals - hence it targets all students regardless of whether or not they plan to pursue an industry career in geoscience or not It can be presented by one person if they are comfortable presenting both the mining and energy sections; ideally it should be delivered by a tag team of two or more geoscientists working together - at least one with an energy and one with a mining background Those students who attend receive a certificate that they can cite in their resumes.

Target Audience:

Primarily student delegates. Of interest to a broad range of geoscientists at any career stage, seeking a solid introduction to the expanding topic of public reporting

Short Course Organizer:

Geoscientists Canada

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Garth Kirkham

President, Kirkham Geosystems Ltd.

Price:

free of charge to student delegates and $150 for professional

Include coffee breaks (no lunch)

Description:

Science and technology has help improve the productivity, sustainability and competitiveness of companies working in the extractive resource and related environmental sectors. Engineering, chemical and biological based science and technology is now being augmented through the applications of genomics. Genomics is the science that deciphers and understands the genome - the code or blueprint, of a living organism (humans, animals, plants, microbes) - to better understand biological systems at a molecular level. In the last decade or so, the field has advanced rapidly and as the technology is now relatively cheap to use and widely accessible. In the natural resource sector, the knowledge and innovations emerging from genomics driven research are unearthing solutions to complex biological challenges including environmental remediation, mineral extraction and new geochemical prospecting tools, and effective passive water treatment systems. This short course will provide an introduction to genomics and provide examples of how genomics is being used across the three major themes of the RFG 2018 conference.

  1. Minerals: in-situ extraction, bioleaching, flotation (efficiency improvements)
  2. Water: ecosystem baseline monitoring, combatting the effects of acid rock drainage, heavy metal deposits and waste water scavenging
  3. Energy: renewable energy production from biomass (wood, algae, waste)

Objectives:

Each session will :

  1. Provide a bedrock understanding of genomics to grow science literacy within the key conference themes (water, minerals, energy).
  2. Provide working knowledge of stream-specific tools and the capacity to conceptually apply them within their sector.
  3. Highlight metrics on how a given tool can save industry time, money and, de-risk operations.
  4. Provide a common working language for participants so they have the capacity to communicate the advantages of life sciences in their industry.

The goal of this event is to build a core foundation of Genomics literacy within the resource extraction industry. Growing support from within industry for genomics fosters the development of champions who will seek out innovative solutions to improve the sustainability and productivity of our natural resource sectors and industries for future generations.

Target Audience:

  • C-level executives / VPs of technology, environment, sustainability; seeking new tools to address problems in their industry related to the core pillars we explore (water, minerals, energy)
  • Engineers, Technicians, field-operators who work with tools first hand and are looking to expand their expertise
  • Consulting companies seeking new avenues to address core pillar issues
  • Academics/scientists who work in this field, see the crossover potential of the application of life sciences in the mineral industry
  • Government/regulators, looking to learn more about the application of these technologies, their impact and who they fit into current/future regulatory frameworks

Short Course Organizer:

Genome BC

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dr. Rachael Ritchie, Sector Director, Agrifood and Natural Resources, Genome BC

Dr. Rachael Ritchie is an internationally trained scientist with two decades of experience in life science research and innovation in North America and Europe. Her experience spans the health, natural resource (aquaculture, fisheries and environment) and biotech sectors, with experience as a bench scientist, R&D team leader, policy analyst and bioeconomy advocate.Since joining Genome BC in 2012 Dr. Ritchie has held responsibility for business development and international partnerships. Dr. Ritchie has led Genome BC's key European-area partnerships spanning natural resource and human health fields. Prior to joining Genome BC she held increasingly responsible positions (1998-2009) at the New Brunswick Research & Productivity Council (RPC). Head of the Food, Fisheries and Aquaculture business unit, Dr. Ritchie and her team worked to bring technical and non-technical solutions to challenges facing bio-based businesses in New Brunswick and Atlantic Canada. From 2010-2012 Dr. Ritchie was a Policy Analyst at the the OECD's Science Technology Policy Division in Paris, France where she worked with member countries and other stakeholders to develop analytical frameworks for innovative science and technology policy. Dr. Ritchie holds a BSc (Hons.) degree from the University of British Columbia and a DPhil in Clinical Medicine (Genetics) from the University of Oxford. Brandon Nichols, Sector Manager, Agrifood and Natural Resources, Genome BC Brandon Nichols joined Genome BC in April 2017 and holds responsibility for our Mining and Energy portfolio. He brings to this role experience in mining sector, genetics, ecology and research. He holds a Masters of Applied Science in Mining Engineering from the University of British Columbia where he applied himself to projects in artisanal and small-scale mining, the reduction of mercury use in extract gold and the application of ceramic water filters in rural areas of developing countries. While pursuing his master, Brandon consulted to companies in the environmental and resource extraction sector in a variety of roles. Prior to working with GBC, Brandon managed the Meanook Biological Research Station from 2007-2012, an ecological field station operated by the University of Alberta. Brandon supported researchers and facilitated projects in climate change, carbon/nitrogen cycling, fisheries, water agriculture, resource extraction and wildlife monitoring.

Price:

$50 Include coffee break (no lunch)

Post-conference One-Day Short Courses

Friday, June 22, 2018

Description:

Lithogeochemical studies form a central component of many exploration and research initiatives, however are often poorly understood and applied. Lithogeochemistry has applications ranging from regional mineral exploration to around mine and deposit extension studies in addition to geometallurgy and mine waste management. A proper understanding of its application can provide fundamental insights into the chemistry and mineralogy and trace-element-mineralogy associations often buried in complex whole rock datasets.

Objectives:

This short course will introduce applications of lithogeochemical interpretation from early stage mineral exploration and our understanding of ore deposits through to linking lithogeochemistry to geometallurgical studies. This short course provides an insight into how industry leaders and researchers are applying lithogeochemistry to answer some of the many questions facing the exploration and mining sector today. The short course will be a full day comprising discussions from both industry leaders (Teck, Anglo American, BHP and First Quantum), consultants and academics and is designed with practical examples of real world application beyond theory.

Target Audience:

Geoscientists, geologists, environmental scientists, mine waste management, geochemists

Short Course Organizer:

AAG

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dr. Ian Dalrymple is a Senior Geochemist with Teck Resources - Advanced Projects. The Course includes components well known through out industry including: Bob Loucks; Sarah Gleeson, Kevin Bryne, Simon Gatehouse, Tim Ireland, Christian Ihlenfeld and Cliff Stanley.

Price:

$350 for Professional / $175 for Student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

Deeply weathered landscapes occur over wide areas in a range of present-day climatic conditions, from rainforest to semi-arid and from tropical to temperate. They include many highly weathered prospective regions in Australia, South America, Africa and SE Asia and present both problems and opportunities for exploration. The challenge is to explore these areas effectively. Effective geochemical exploration can only be achieved by understanding the regolith and landscape and metal dispersion processes that have occurred within it in different climatic regions.

Objectives:

The course will provide an introduction to the nature and formation of regolith and landscapes of these terrains, comparing and contrasting them across regions, including recommendations for a suitable terminology. Geochemical dispersion will be discussed within the context of regolith-landscape evolution in different regions and illustrated with numerous case studies based on research and exploration experience. The course will include:

  • Development and terminology of weathering profiles
  • Regolith-landscape processes and landscape evolution
  • Regolith-landform mapping and identification of residual and transported regolith
  • Computer based methods for making maps
  • Metals (including gold) geochemistry during regolith evolution
  • Mechanisms of metal dispersion through transported cover
  • Geochemical exploration approaches in residual areas (complete and truncated profiles)
  • Geochemical exploration approaches in areas of transported cover
  • Biota for mineral exploration
  • Fine soil geochemistry
  • Wrap up and discussion

Target Audience:

Exploration geochemists, exploration geologists, junior geologists, students

Short Course Organizer:

AAG

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Ravi is a Chief Research Scientist at CSIRO and an Adjunct Professor in regolith geology and geochemistry at Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia. He joined CSIRO in 1987 as a Research Scientist in the Division of Mineralogy, carrying out research into methods of exploring for concealed mineral deposits in Australia’s deeply weathered terrains. Ravi was Applications Coordinator of the CRC for Landscape Evolution and Mineral exploration (1995-2001) and Program leader of Program 2 for Landscape Environments and Mineral Exploration (2001-2008). He has over 35 years research experience in regolith geoscience and exploration geochemistry, mainly in developing procedures for gold, base metals, heavy minerals and bauxites exploration in deeply weathered terrains. He has been a leader of many collaborative industry-funded projects in regolith geoscience and exploration geochemistry. These projects include multi-disciplinary, multi-client projects through Australian Mineral Industries Research Association (AMIRA), projects with individual companies and Geological Surveys. His current research in collaboration with the industry is focused on understanding metal dispersion processes through transported cover and has led several multi-clients CSIRO-AMIRA projects on this topic. He has received many national and international awards for regolith research in collaboration with the mining industry, including a Gold Medal from the International Association of Applied Geochemists in 2015. He has been invited for many national and international conferences and conducted numerous regolith courses and workshops for many mining companies in Australia and overseas. Ravi has authored and co-authored over 340 publications (fully and lightly refereed, technical reports) including 5 whole journal issues/monographs.

Price:

$350 for professional and $175 for student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

Integration of geological, geophysical and geochemical information across a range of scales has been a massive enabler over the last 20 years contributing to a more holistic understanding of mineral systems and their attendant ore deposits. In terms of continental evolution, we now recognise the critical role of the interaction between the global geodynamic system (including plate tectonics) and the SCLM. Partitioning of deformation, and the development of trans- lithospheric structures, provide a focus for heat, magma and volatile transfer from the convecting mantle to the upper crustal environment. These processes leave geophysical and geochemical signatures in the SCLM that can be imaged using surface techniques, and all world-class deposits, and many other deposits are known to have anomalous mantle beneath them. Thus, broad scale geophysical and geochemical methods can be used for regional scale targetting of prospective areas, especially in regions of thick cover. Understanding the role of prior "fertilising" processes coupled with an ability to recognise key geodynamic triggers, means that mineral systems concepts can be systematically applied to maps of lithospheric architecture to generate opportunities for a breakthrough capability in mineral deposit discovery. This Short Course will be presented by six of the top experts in their fields of geophysics, geochemistry and tectonics.

Objectives:

To teach attendees to think holistically about geophysical and geochemical data on regional scales in terms of enabling cost-effective targetting of large-scale mineral systems

Target Audience:

Exploration managers, Chief geoscientists, Government, industry and university geoscientists

Short Course Organizer:

ManoTick GeoSolutions Ltd.

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Prof. Alan Jones, lead facilitator, world expert in magnetotellurics for SCLM characterization.

Dr. David Snyder, world expert in seismology for SCLM characterization

Dr. Juan Carlos Afonso, world expert in joint inversion of multiple data types for SCLM characterization

Prof. Graham Pearson, world expert in geochemical imaging for SCLM characterization

Dr. Herman Grutter, world expert in economic potential of large scale mineral systems

Dr. Graham Begg, world expert in tectonics of large scale mineral systems

Price:

$500 coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

Geochemical and mineralogical data are now routinely collected on the same sample material, but the interpretation of these data sets is often done separately. Geochemical data may include assays or multi-element data collected from crushed rock or from surficial material. Mineralogical data may include hyperspectral analyses, semi-quantitative XRD or heavy mineral separates. Integration of complementary data sets such as these on a single interpretive platform allows for a better understanding of geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with hydrothermal mineralisation and secondary dispersion.

Objectives:

The short course will enable the interpretation of geochemical and mineralogical data collected on the same samples by various means including fp-XRF, XRD, hyper-spectral, and conventional geochemical techniques.This short course will require participants to bring a laptop computer and download a demonstration copy of ioGAS interpretative software in the week prior to the course if they do not already have a license. Participants will undertake interpretation of published data sets following lectures to provide background on expected geochemical and mineralogical responses from some common hydrothermal mineral deposit types. It is designed to dovetail with other introductory short courses being proposed by the AAG.

Target Audience:

Geologists, data managers, exploration geologists/geochemists, laboratory staff

Short Course Organizer:

AAG

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dennis has 35 years experience as a geologist specializing in geochemistry and economic geology in a wide range of environments in both the minerals and the petroleum industries, as an academic, and in geological surveys. In recent years he has been involved as a consultant in the development of exploration programs for precious and base metals exploration in Australia, North America, South America and Africa. Specifically, this has included contributing to exploration targeting reviews and understanding gold and base metals mineral systems, the design, management and interpretation of surficial geochemical surveys, the interpretation of lithogeochemical data, the preparation of QA/QC protocols with a particular emphasis on sampling coarse gold deposits, reviews of geochemical data quality, and contributions to NI43-101 and JORC/Valmin technical reports. He has published extensively in the areas of applied geochemistry, economic geology, alteration mineralogy and thermal history analysis for tectonic and petroleum exploration applications.

Price:

$350 for professional and $175 for student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

Contributions will cover all scales of structural controls on ore deposits from vein systems to regional structures in presentations lasting 45-60 minutes. Presentations will range from regional syntheses to individual case studies on gold, volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS), Ni-Cu magmatic sulfide, unconformity-type uranium, and porphyry deposits.

Objectives:

  • Provide syntheses on structural controls on different types of ore deposits
  • Provide an overview of the tectonic controls on the formation of ore systems at the greenstone belt to craton scales
  • Teach practical tools and techniques for determining the structural controls on ore deposits

Target Audience:

Graduate students and Professional Geologists in Universities, Industry and Government Surveys

Short Course Organizer:

Mineral Deposits Division and Structural and Tectonic Division of the GAC

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Bruno Lafrance and Shoufa Lin will be the two conveners. Lafrance is professor in Structural Geology at Laurentian University and Associate Director Metal Earth. Lin is professor in Structural Geology at the University of Waterloo. Both have worked extensively on structural controls on the genesis and modification of ore deposits.

Price:

$325 Include coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

Over the last decade, in almost every industry, there has been rapid growth in the application of data analytics to business decisions. Consequently, to be successful, the mining industry will have to rapidly adopt and apply the power of data analytics to the ever-growing volume of geochemical data sets that will be amassed over the next 10 years. Participants in this workshop will learn several data analytic methods applicable to geochemical data analysis that will serve them well in the future.

Multi-element geochemical datasets collected during government surveys or mineral exploration programs are a rich source of information, useful in mineral exploration, geologic mapping and environmental applications. These datasets commonly contain many thousands of observations (sample sites) analyzed for more than 50 elements. Compositional variations in samples from these surveys reflect different geologic processes responsible for their formation. These processes can be elucidated using the stoichiometry and mineralogy of the geological materials sampled, coupled with an appreciation for the methods used to collect and analyze the samples.

Geochemical data are compositional and thus is affected by the problem of closure; the constant sum constraint that interferes with the effective use of many data analysis methods. Formation of simple molar element ratios resolves the constant sum problem and readily and effectively model processes controlled by mineral stoichiometry and metasomatism. Log-ratios of compositional data also avoid the constant sum problem, but allow use of a wider range of statistical tools to unlock valuable information contained therein. Collectively, these data analytic methods can be applied at many stages of investigation, from process ‘discovery’ through ‘validation’ and into ‘prediction’.

A range of multivariate data analytic methods will be demonstrated to ‘discover’, ‘validate’, and ‘predict’ processes in geochemical data. These methods employ both linear and non-linear methods to identify patterns of import in the data.

Topics presented will include:

  • Methods used to ‘discover’ processes include: log-ratio analysis, principal component analysis, independent component analysis, multi-dimensional scaling, minimum/maximum autocorrelation factor analysis, and various types of cluster analysis;
  • Methods used to ‘validate’ geochemical processes, including: Pearce and general element ratio analysis to identify primary, alteration and mineralization processes using lithogeochemistry data;
  • Methods used to ‘predict’ geochemical processes including linear/quadratic discriminant analysis, neural networks, logistic regression, random forests, support vector machines, geospatial coherence and others; and
  • Other methods, including the use of the continuous wavelet transform for detecting multiscale geological boundaries in drill hole geochemical data, multi-fractal techniques for anomaly recognition in covered terrains, and multivariate geostatistical approaches to mapping geochemical processes.

Objectives:

Participants of this workshop will learn methods for data analytics in geochemistry. The workshop will cover the application of; applying ratios and logratios to compositional data; molar element ratio methods; multivariate methods including principal component analysis, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, classification and regression trees, multi-fractals, and linear/non-linear geostatistics.

Target Audience:

Geologists, geochemists, data management, GIS. Statisticians, Earth Scientists

Short Course Organizer:

AAG

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Natalie Caciagli, Juan Carlos Ordonez-Calderon, Qiuming Cheng, Eric Grunsky, June Hill, Jennifer McKinley, Ute Mueller, Cliff Stanley, Raimon Tolosana-Delgado.

Price:

$350 for professional and $175 for student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

On-site geochemistry and mineralogy underwent a fast development with mineral exploration and mine site management in the last decade. This brings field teams the opportunity of immediate decisions and dynamic targeting, with significants benefits in time and costs. Systematic field measurements can provide reliable information for lab sample screening and for target selection, prioritisation and geochemical-geological mapping. However, discrepancies between field measurements and laboratory analyses may happen and cast doubt on the former. This cannot be solved without good analytical practice and QA/QC, and with a sufficient geochemical knowledge.

Objectives:

This short course is intended to provide the geologist / geochemist an up to date overview of field analytics, how to make profit of them and apply them to the design of exploration surveys, drilling monitoring, ore and waste management and site closure.

Target Audience:

geologists, geochemists, mineral exploration, decision makers

Short Course Organizer:

AAG

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dr. Bruno Lemière explored most of the possible paths for a geochemist in the BRGM group (French Geological Survey). He began as a mapping geologist and igneous geochemist, then joined mineral exploration as Chief geochemist for BRGM Saudi Arabia from 1990 to 1993. He joined then the ANTEA engineering company to coordinate the geochemistry activities in the deep storage of high activity nuclear waste sector, for the French agency (ANDRA). Since 1998, he is an applied geochemistry expert and international projects manager with BRGM's Environment and Process Division, with activities for private or public clients in Turkey, India, Egypt, Romania, Greece, Guinea, Mauritania and Tanzania. His main focus is on sampling, field analysis and instrumentation, for mining, environmental and agricultural issues. He leads or contributes to European applied research projects, especially in the water and sediment sectors. He is also operating in the mining and analytical sectors as a free-lance consulting geochemist. Bruno holds a MS in industrial and analytical chemistry (1978) from the Lyon Chemistry School (CPE) and a PhD (1982) in geology and geochemistry from the University of Lyon.

Price:

$350 for professional and $175 for student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

Regardless of the field of study, accurate information is essential to maintaining the integrity of research and making correct business decisions. A wide range of technical data is collected for geological, environmental and mining projects and in all cases the accuracy and precision of the information must be measured and understood. Poor quality data results for a research project may result in the inability to repeat and validate the study. For mineral exploration and mining applications, distorted findings can result in wasted resources.

Objectives:

The AAG short course will introduce participants to the basics of quality control with an emphasis on collection of geochemical data. Fundamental concepts such as contamination, analytical drift and precision will be introduced using case histories. The methods to monitor and control data quality, such as the insertion of barren materials, reference materials and duplicates will be explained as well as the statistics and graphs necessary to identify quality control failures. Exercises, primarily using Excel spreadsheets, will provide participants with hands-on learning and tools to use in the workplace. The afternoon session will concentrate on the lessons learned since 1999 when the Canadian security exchanges mandated the use of assay quality control in the mining industry. Whereas, the mining industry has generally implemented systematic quality control procedures, questions still arise for practitioners. Common questions around "fit for purpose" data, correct control limits, application of precision information and legal requirements will be addressed.

Target Audience:

Geologist, Exploration management, Data Management, resource geologists, geochemists, QA/QC managers, P.Geo-accredited geoscientists

Short Course Organizer:

AAG

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

University in 1981, Lynda Bloom gained experience as an exploration geochemist and commercial laboratory manager. She has been president of the consulting company Analytical Solutions Ltd. since 1985 and has worked internationally on projects ranging from stream sediment surveys to mine laboratory audits. Since the introduction of NI43-101 reporting standards in 2000, she has helped numerous companies meet regulatory standards cost- effectively. She is recognized as a world-expert on sampling, assaying and quality control, participating in over 50 short courses and workshops. She has held management and director positions at several public companies.

R. Mohan Srivastava, principal Geostatistian, FSS Consultants

Michelle Ramshaw, Global Quality manager, Geochemistry, ALS Global

Allison Laidlow, Geoscientist, BC Ministry of Transportation & Infrastructure

Dennis Arne, Principal Geochemist, CSA Global

Pim Van Geffen, President, VanGeochem

Price:

$350 for professional and $175 for student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

An overview of mine water management covering integrated water resource management, water balances, sources, water use optimization, water quality and treatment and long term stewardship.

Target Audience:

Mining company representatives, regulators, and academics

Short Course Organizer:

University of British Columbia

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Nadja Kunz is an Assistant Professor at the Liu Institute for Global Issues and Norman B Keevil Mining Engineering at the University of British Columbia (UBC). Her research focuses on developing new models to optimize water management in the mining sector, and anticipating future water risks. Nadja's experience spans academe and practice, and she currently consults as a Water Specialist for IFC's Advisory Services team. Previously, Nadja gained extensive operational experience in the Australian mining sector, including as a metallurgical technician for the Northparkes copper/gold mine and in process control engineering at the Yarwun Alumina Refinery. She has also worked in sustainability reporting for Rio Tinto and consulted for Anglo Gold Ashanti. She holds a Bachelor of Chemical Engineering (hons) and Business Management, and a PhD from the University of Queensland. Bern Klein is a Professor of Mining Engineering at the Norman B. Keevil Institute of Mining Engineering at UBC. Bern's research interest has long been the production of minerals and chemical processing technologies. After completing both his B.A.Sc. and Ph.D. in Mining Engineering at the University of British Columbia, Bern spent eight years as a consulting process metallurgist before Rick Lawrence, the Department Head of what was then UBC Mining and Mineral Processing Engineering, invited him to apply for an opening on the faculty. Bern accepted the invitation, hoping both to expand the type of work that he had been doing in consulting, and to contribute to the future of the Department and the industry.

Price:

$750 Include coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

This one-day short course will provide a provide a ‘state of the art’ training in all aspect of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) with a focus on research frontiers related to resource exploration and environmental/ climate change. The basics will be covered in the morning sessions: continental and oceanic flood basalts and their plumbing systems (layered intrusions, sills, dykes & deep crustal underplating). There will be an overview of additional topics: Archean LIPs, planetary analogues, associated Silicic LIPs (SLIPs), carbonatites and kimberlites, origin (plume & alternatives), links to continental breakup and the supercontinent cycle, geochemistry, associated topographic effects (regional uplift & basin formation) & associated compressional tectonics. The afternoon sessions will first focus on links with resource implications (metallogeny, oil/gas and aquifer systems). The links with a broad range of commodity types are captured in our 5-part classification system and we will also present our latest strategies for using the LIPs record in multi-commodity, multi-scale exploration targeting. The second afternoon focus will be on the rapidly developing links with dramatic environmental & climate change including mass extinction events. We summarize the latest research on the role of LIPs (and SLIPs) in dramatically changing atmospheric and oceanic composition through time, including global warming, glaciations, anoxia, step-wise oxygenation, acid rain/ocean acidification, enhanced hydrothermal and terrestrial nutrient fluxes, and mercury poisoning.

Objectives:

Provides an overview of all aspects of LIPs

Target Audience:

Students and professional geoscientists

Short Course Organizer:

GAC

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

After finishing undergraduate work at Wesleyan University in 1978, Dr. Richard E. Ernst was attracted north to Canada by geological field research, and he received an MSc from the University of Toronto in 1981, and PhD from Carleton University in 1989. He then worked until 2003 on contracts mainly through the Geological Survey of Canada. At this point he started his own consulting firm 'Ernst Geosciences', and also became an Adjunct Professor at Carleton University. He has been co-leader (2003-2013), and leader since 2013 of the Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) Commission of IAVCEI (International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior). In 2009, Dr. Ernst co- launched a consortium of industry sponsors contributing 1.5 million dollars toward using the LIP's record to reconstruct the arrangement of crustal blocks within supercontinents back through time. In April 2012, he was PI on a successful 700 thousand dollars NSERC CRD grant to support graduate student research on LIPs in his position as Scientist-in-Residence of the Faculty of Science at Carleton University. Dr. Ernst completed a comprehensive book on Large Igneous Provinces for Cambridge University Press (published September 2014), and recently published (with colleagues) in Nature Geoscience (April 2016) on using the LIP record to demonstrate a connection between southern Siberia and northern Laurentia throughout much of the Proterozoic. In April 2014 he also became a part time professor at Tomsk State University, Tomsk, Siberia, Russia.

Price:

$250 Include coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

The Association for Mineral Exploration’s (AME) Integrated Social Responsibility (ISR) Committee proposes to sponsor a full-day, hands-on pre-conference Short Course, entitled, “Building Lasting Asset Value - Practical ways to integrate Corporate Social Responsibility into Mineral Exploration and Development projects”. Recognizing that Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) begins at the exploration stage, and not just when a mine is approved and built, this collaborative, intimate workshop is designed for project geologists, managers and staff on the ground. The course will follow an interactive workshop format, designed to give participants a solid practical introduction to three cornerstones that support successful CSR – demonstrating how mineral explorers can integrate and operationalize CSR within their projects and corporate culture:

  1. PLANNING: THE BUSINESS CASE FOR CSR
    • What CSR is, and isn’t
    • How CSR can improve asset value
    • Incorporating net social benefit concepts into project planning
    • Why and how CSR should be built into every project plan and budget
  2. ENGAGING: CONSULTING EFFECTIVELY WITH STAKEHOLDERS AND RIGHTS HOLDERS
    • Relationship-building
    • Collaborative planning
    • Avoiding and managing social risks
    • Monitoring progress throughout all phases of the project
  3. IMPLEMENTING: SUSTAINABLE OPERATIONAL PRACTICES
    • Minimizing the project’s footprint over the project lifecycle
    • Applying local and traditional knowledge throughout all phases of the project
    • Record-keeping, monitoring progress and tracking the Social Chain of Custody

In each key area, facilitated interactive workshop exercises will highlight practical, real-world scenarios for explorers in British Columbia - with potential applicability for projects elsewhere in Canada and the world. A variety of methodologies and tools, including real life scenarios and worksheet development, are intended to draw participants into simulated project planning and problem-solving. In order to optimize the value of this intimate and interactive workshop format, AME proposes to limit registration in the CSR Short Course to a maximum of 50 participants. The Short Course is planned for a full-day, eight-hour time period. Facilitation will be provided by AME’s ISR Committee members Workshop materials will present easy to follow and use scenarios and tools to ensure participants have valuable hands-on takeaways.

Target Audience:

This collaborative, intimate workshop is designed for project geologists, managers and staff on the ground.

Short Course Organizer:

Association for Mineral Exploration (AME)

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Diana Walls, AME Senior Director, Strategic Policy

Price:

$300 Include course notes and coffee breaks (no lunch)

Description:

The course comprises several modules selected to fit the audience type and requirements. Each module was constructed by an expert in that particular field. The modules comprise up-to-date ore-body models and spectacular imagery that summarize the principal features of the main ore deposit types, including resource characteristics, geometry, ore-formation process, mineralogy, extraction and mining methods etc.

Objectives:

To provide an introduction to economic geology for university students, academic faculty, young professionals, and technical professionals from other disciplines.

Target Audience:

The course is particularly suited to non-economic geologists who have an interest in natural resources, but only limited or superficial knowledge of the details and specifics of mineral deposits.

Short Course Organizer:

Society of Economic Geologists

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Laurence Robb and Bruce Gemmell

Price:

Late registration (After April 15): $295 for professional, $145 for student

Include coffee breaks